Kailin
"reckon"="expect to do"? I am confused about one meaning of "reckon", stated in 3.1 of http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/reckon. [informal] Expect to do a particular thing: e.g1. I reckon to get away by two-thirty e.g2 In the meadow between the island and the house she waves her stick in the direction of several saplings (she reckons to have planted nearly 1,000 trees in her lifetime). When I searched "expect", the Oxford dict returned its meaning as "Regard (something) as likely to happen:" (the one I think is closest to the context above.) So I was wondering: in this case, does "reckon"="expect to do"="hope to"/"hope sth will happen"? Or how will you interpretate it? Thanks a lot!
Feb 1, 2016 3:56 PM
Answers · 16
I posted this in the comments instead of answers, so I'm reposting it: 'Reckon' is a very Southern American word and it isn't very common. If you were to use it normally in everyday language and you weren't from the south, you may get a funny look. It's also used to mean 'to think/assume.' For example: I think his house is about a mile down the road. Or I reckon his house is about a mile down the road. Both are technically correct, but 'reckon' is much more informal. I wouldn't worry about this word. You will hardly ever hear it if at all, and you won't need to use it.
February 1, 2016
Yeah, that definition is good. It's like you believe something to be true. "I reckon" can replace "I think" or "I believe". For example: "It's going to be a big storm, I reckon." That's pretty much the same as "It's going to be a big storm, I think." (or "I expect"). Reckon is a little bit of a funny word. It's mostly used in rural dialects, especially in the southern US. I imagine cowboys or farmers saying it, but it would be a little unusual for most people to use it in daily conversation. You can still use it, but it has a southern / "wild west" connotation, at least for me. This video sums up perfectly how to use it :) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DolcGsUTkEQ Have fun! I reckon you will.
February 1, 2016
It could have slightly different meanings: - calculate , expect or conclude after calculation as in your example : I reckon to get away by 2 30 - think , be of the opinion, imagine , guess or assume - to regard or think of as She reckoned him to be one of the best designers of his time .
February 1, 2016
'Reckon' literally means to 'calculate', so if you say 'I reckon to get away by 2.30' or 'I reckon I'll get away by 2.30', it's what you expect will happen. You've thought about all the things that need to be done before then, you've made a rough estimate of the time they'll take, and made a confident guess at 2.30. You're not 100% sure, but that is the time you expect to be able to get away.
February 1, 2016
Yes exactly , I reckon to get away by 2:30 means I expect to leave at 2:30 . And I reckon to have planted ...number of trees means I estimate to have plants certain number of trees:)
February 1, 2016
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Kailin
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