Claudia
What's the meaning of these sentences? 1. He should've said "heel" What's the meaning of "heel" in this context? 2. slag it 3. Delicate like a moose. Is this a common word?In the Batman animation, 1. He (might be a security guard) cried, "Stay back", and a monster(looks like a hyena) killed the security guard. The monster's fellow said, "He should've said "heel"" 2. Another monster was driving, and he crashed the car(spaceship?) to the wall, and said "slag it" 3. The monster crashed again, so dancing girl? said, "Delicate like a moose" She just used an irony?
Feb 4, 2016 3:55 PM
Answers · 7
1. He (might be a security guard) cried, "Stay back", and a monster(looks like a hyena) killed the security guard. The monster's fellow said, "He should've said "heel"" This is a joke [ and a bad one :) ] in reference to the monster that resembles a hyena. Hyenas look a lot like dogs, and "heel" is the common English command that we use to tell our dog to follow us. The heel is the back part of the foot, so telling a dog to "heel" is telling him to follow you at your heels. It's a really bad joke! I think the speaker is referring to how the security guard said, "Stay back!" He seems to be implying that the guard should've said "Heel!" instead of "Stay Back!" because the monster looks like a dog. It's a terrible joke because it really doesn't make sense. The two declarations don't mean the same thing at all so the joke falls flat, as we say. Sometimes cartoons have really terrible jokes. ------------------------------------ 3. The monster crashed again, so dancing girl? said, "Delicate like a moose" She just used an irony? Using "delicate" in this circumstance means something similar to "careful" or "precise". The monster has crashed more than once, so the girl is making a sarcastic remark. She's saying, "You're as careful as a moose." A moose is very large and doesn't pay any attention to all the things it steps on or knocks over while it walks through the forest. So a moose not careful at all! I'm not sure if irony is exactly the right term, but it's definitely sarcasm.
February 4, 2016
#1: The context is somewhat vague but I think it was supposed to be an ironic situation. Since hyenas are associated with dogs and Guards are usually with dogs. So the monster's fellow is trying to tell the guard that he should have commanded the "hyena" monster to stop. #2: Well the word "slag" is a British slang to describe something worthless. The term "slag it" is basically a more frustrated and albeit vulgar way of saying "just forget about it and move on". #3: From this sentence I can say it is used in irony. Though this is the first time I have seen this sentence from this context. XD Hope this helps :D
February 4, 2016
#1 - Actually, the context is not clear, so it's hard to say what the meaning is. This could be a sentence correcting someone's spelling, or it could be a sentence describing that someone gave the wrong command to a dog, but I really don't know. I would need more context to help you. #2 - This sounds like a British or Australian phrase, so I'll let one of the Brits or Aussies handle it. #3 - When I first read this one I laughed a little inside. It doesn't sound very common to me, and my first instinct is to say it's probably an oxymoron. A moose is definitely not very delicate! Some context might help me understand it better. It's also possible it's a common phrase in another part of the English-speaking world and I just never heard it.
February 4, 2016
Are you sure it is "moose" (an animal) and not "mousse" (a dessert)?
February 4, 2016
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Claudia
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, Korean, Other
Learning Language
English, Korean