Vadim
Is it possible to use 'to harness' instead of 'to use'? Sentences: 1)They harness the water to their advantage. 2)And the most important thing is to harness your will and let it go. 3)There's new energy to harness, new jobs to be created, new schools to build... 4)We harnessed whole planets and their gravity to chase down the comet. 5)Reluctantly, the elder sister harnessed the most powerful magic known to ponydom: the Elements of Harmony. 6)He harnesses the power of motivation.
Feb 10, 2016 2:56 PM
Answers · 8
Sometimes. The meanings are different. To "harness" means "to use in one specific way." The literal idea refers to work animals. A harness is a set of straps you put on a horse or ox. A horse is a powerful animal. Without a harness, it does whatever it likes. To "harness" a horse is to put a harness on it. You can attach it to a wagon. Now you can use the power of the horse to work for you, pulling the wagon. I use a car to travel in. I don't "harness" a car. Gasoline, outside of a car engine, is a dangerous substance. It burns or can explode. A car engine uses gasoline. But in this case we can use a phrase with the word "harness." The car engine harnesses the power of gasoline to do something useful for me, just we can harness a horse to do something useful for us.
February 10, 2016
In a few specific situations, yes. It's mostly used when talking about sources of energy, such as the image of harnessing wind and wave power. Remember that it is an image - it's like putting a horse into a harness to channel and control its running power.
February 10, 2016
You sometimes can, but why would you want to?
February 10, 2016
What do you mean?
February 10, 2016
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Vadim
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English