Artur
adjective or something else? My jorney has never been delayed due to bed weather. (delayed - adj. ?) I think people should get paid for days of due to illness. (paid - adj. ?) When the weather is very severe flights are sometimes cancelled. (cancelled - adj. ?)
Feb 12, 2016 7:35 PM
Answers · 17
My jorney has never been delayed due to bed weather > past particle of delay I think people should get paid for days of due to illness >past particle of pay When the weather is very severe , flights are sometimes cancelled. >are + adjective
February 12, 2016
My journey has never been delayed due to bad weather. Delayed - past participle of the verb 'to delay', i.e. the third form of the verb. We use it to form the passive voice. Это пассивный (страдательный) залог. I think people should get paid for days off due to illness. Paid = past participle of the verb 'to pay'. 'Get paid' is also passive voice. When the weather is very severe flights are sometimes cancelled. Cancelled = past participle of the verb 'to cancel'. 'Are cancelled' is also passive voice.
February 12, 2016
These are all verbs. Because the sentences are in passive voice, identifying the verb is more difficult. But in each case they are verbs. If you put the sentence into simple voice it is easier to identify. Bad weather delayed my journey. People are paid for days missed due to illness. Flights are cancelled when weather is severe.
February 13, 2016
The way I think about it is that you can tell if a past participle is being used as part of the main verb phrase if you can transform the sentence into an active one and keep the meaning. If you can't then, it's a participial adjective. I've not seen this written down anywhere so please consider this theory as tentative. a) Bad weather has never delayed my journey. ("due to" has the function of "by" here.) - verb c) They sometimes cancel flights - verb b) is hard for me to give a definite answer. The meaning of "get paid" is the same as "be paid". So : "people (employers) should pay people (employees) for days off.." This accurately transforms the sentence but without using the word "get". As the phrase "to get paid" is idiomatic and colloquial, and "to be got(ten) paid" is never said, it may be that "paid" is defined as an an adjective, and this would be my guess. It's obviously more important to know how to use the phrase correctly than to classify it, though correct classification does help when analysing language. Good question.
February 12, 2016
The flight is cancelled = A cancelled flight ( adjective)
February 12, 2016
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Artur
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