Community Web Version Now Available
Samantha
When to use le, la, les,des, de? I'm taking French in university and I always answer this correctly in the practice exercises. I speak Spanish so that helps me a bit but I'd rather understand why I should use which word instead of guessing correctly.
2016年10月27日 11:36
5
0
Answers · 5
… let's unpack these class by class. « Le », « la » « l' » and « les » are definite articles. Their use depends on the number and grammatical gender of the noun that follows them: « le » comes before a masculine singular noun, « la » before a feminine singular noun, « l' » if the singular noun of either gender begins with a vowel, and « les » before plurals. Hence: « le crayon » = the pencil (m) « la gomme » = the eraser (f) « l'avion » = the plane (m) « l'oie » = the goose (f) « les crayons » = the pencils « les oies » = the geese There are two types of « des », one a plural indefinite article and one a contraction of « de + les ». I'll go into each case separately below. « Un », « une » and « des » are indefinite articles, « un » being singular, and « des » being plural. There's no need to think about combinations with vowels here: these forms all end in consonants (at least when pronounced). Hence: « un crayon » = a pencil « une oie » = a goose « des crayons » = (some) pencils « des oies » = (some) geese The other « des » is a contraction of « de + les », or what's called an « article contracté ». This specific paradigm also contains « du », « de la » and « de l' ». The « de » used here is genitive (kind of like English “of”) and marks, among other things, possession, hence: « le château du prince » = the prince's castle « les jouets des enfants » = the children's toys (as in the toys belonging to a specific group of children) On their own (without « des »), « du », « de la » and « de l' » form another class – the « articles partitifs ». These are used to describe taking an undefined portion of something (represented by an uncountable noun). For example: « Tu veux du gâteau ? » = Would you like some cake? « Je prends volontiers de la bière » = I'd gladly take some beer Negating a sentence containing an article partitif, however, changes « du » / « de la » / « de l' » into a simple « de » : « Non merci, pas de café pour moi » = No coffee for me, thank you
2016年10月27日
Samantha
Language Skills
English, French, Spanish
Learning Language
French