Rafeek
what is the difference between these and those!?
Aug 16, 2018 1:02 PM
Answers · 6
Hi Rafeek, Both words are demonstrative pronouns which we use to refer to something that is specific. The most basic difference is proximity: "These" refer to a group of things that are closer to the speaker; "Those" refer to a group of things farther away. Examples: "These books are mine." (A student pointing to a stack of books that he is carrying -- the books are close to him) "Those paintings have captured my attention." (A visitor gesturing at some paintings at the far end of a gallery -- they are a distance away) Another deciding factor for using "these" or "those" is time. If something happened in the past, the use of "those" is more appropriate. Examples: Those were the days when our country was newly independent. (further in the past) These are the environmental issues that we will pass down to our future generations. (referring to something current) It is also noteworthy to mention that "these" and "those" are the plural forms of "this" and "that" respectively. I am mentioning them separately as the difference that you learn between "these" and "those" can be applied to "this" and "that" with the exception that "this" and "that" are used for singular nouns. Examples: This book is mine. / That painting has captured my attention. Just as a side discussion, "that" is also used in relative clauses. Example: 1. These are the machines that break down all the time! 2. This is the machine that breaks down all the time! You may notice in 1. that "These" (plural form of "this") refer to "the machines" while "that" is not used to provide information about proximity or time. Instead, "that" is part of a relative clause (i.e. break down all the time!) to provide more information about the machines. Therefore, "that" does not necessarily need to describe a singular noun. 2. is correct as well. Martin has corrected shared that "these" and "those" expresses our mental and emotional distance from others, and has given useful examples. I hope THESE help you.
August 16, 2018
"These" indicates that the group of nouns is close to the speaker, while "those" indicates that they are further away. It can either communicate physical distance, or mental or emotional distance. examples: I like those shoes you are wearing. These pencils I am holding can be used to write on those sheets of paper that you have. Those people aren't friends of mine. These are the restaurants I really like, but I don't like those ones.
August 16, 2018
Great explanations!
August 16, 2018
They are the plural forms of "this" and "that." They are closely related to the words "here" and "there." "This," "these," and "here" carry the idea of "nearby," or "the main things we are talking about now." "That," "those," and "there" carry the idea of "further away," or "something we are going to be arriving at or talking about a little later." For example, right now I am sitting at a Mac. There is a screen connected to it. In the other room, there is a Windows computer, with its own screen. I am using this Mac. This Mac is here. This screen is 1600x900 pixels. These devices are mine. (We use "these" instead of "this" because there are two devices.) My wife is using that Windows computer. That Windows computer is there. That screen is 1920×1200 pixels. Those devices are hers. Here's an example of "these" and "those" that doesn't refer to space. English teacher might say, "Today, we have been talking about the simple present, simple past, and simple future. These are basic tenses, and usually consist of a single word. Tomorrow, we will discuss the progressive and perfect tenses. Those are compound tenses that are made up of two or three words."
August 16, 2018
Hi Rafeek, I'd like to add as well that: 1.These is the plural of This "This car is red" (1 and near the speaker) "These cars are red" (2,3,4...ect and near the speaker) 2.Those is the plural of That "That car is blue" (1 and far from the speaker) "Those cars are blue (2,3,4...ect and far from the speaker)
August 16, 2018
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