Hilda
enable or enables? This is an example I have read from an English teaching material "...the English speaker has at his disposal a vocabulary and a set of grammatical rules which enables him to communicate his thoughts and feelings, in a variety of styles, to another English speakers." It is pointed out that "enables" should be " enable" because it aligns with grammatical rules instead of a vocabulary. However, isn't the subject of the this clause "a set of grammatical rules"? which one is correct? Thanks.
Sep 13, 2018 6:43 AM
Answers · 3
Personally, I would interpret this sentence as having "a vocabulary and a set of grammatical rules" at the head of the clause: two things, meaning the verb should be "enable". ...the English speaker has at his disposal [[a vocabulary and a set of grammatical rules] which enable him to communicate his thoughts and feelings...]. (Also Gary is right about "another English speakers")
September 13, 2018
To me, it is a mistake, and it should be 'enable'. Is that what you mean by 'it is pointed out'? To me, the object is '...vocabulary and ... rules'. I suggest you get a newer book though. The style of that language is rather archaic, as is the sexist 'he/his'. It reads as if it were written 50-100 years ago. There is another error as well. 'another English speakers'. It should be 'other English speakers' or 'another English speaker'.
September 13, 2018
I thought it referes to both of them, hence plural. Does it align? A and B enable me to Y. A and lots of Bs enable me to Y. A enables me to Y. A set of As enables me to Y. I guess in the last one, enables connects to a set as you say, being singular.
September 13, 2018
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