Natalia
Present Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, etc. Corrections and explanations, please) I’m not surprised he has failed that exam. He has not been working hard recently. Does Perfect Continuous emphasize duration here? What sounds natural to YOU? ps I know that PrP & PrPC can be used interchangeably with verbs like live, work, etc. But authors of tests like this have something in mind. I'd like to read their thoughts to be able to explain things to guys preparing for such tests)
Jun 16, 2019 9:37 AM
Answers · 12
The use of the present perfect continuous emphasises the repeated work and/or constant state of working hard over a particular period. The emphasis is on the activity of working hard. This is different from the present perfect (simple), which would stress the completion or result of the work. The time period would be the same in both cases.
June 16, 2019
I’m not surprised he has failed that exam. <<== "he has failed" (a completed action) He has not been working hard recently. <<== "He has not been working hard" (negation of a repeated activity) Su. Ki. has given an excellent answer. The present perfect continuous emphasizes a repeated activity. For more details, English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy is an excellent book for self-study and general reference. There are PDFs floating on the net. 4th edition - p. 18. You can use the present perfect continous for actions repeated over a period of time. "Silvia is a very good tennis player. She's been playing since she was eight."
June 16, 2019
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June 16, 2019
@Samuel Thanks. I was for the "failed" but there was no such option in the test. The girl asked if she could use hasn't worked instead of hasn't been working. She could according to grammar books but she had to choose one option. I'm just curious if natives can explain the difference)) if they feel any))
June 16, 2019
I need more explanation of what you want, is that sentence from a test? I thought it was a pretty standard statement... the kid failed the exam. Maybe If you said “I’m not surprised he failed that exam, he hasn’t been working hard recently” that would sound a little more natural, but other then that I think the author is just trying to get across that someone failed a test.
June 16, 2019
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