Good one
Does this passage sound natural and grammatical? 馁 is an ancient Chinese language, also known as Literary Chinese, which is a traditional style of written Chinese that evolved from the classical language, making it different from any modern spoken form of Chinese. The two characters mean the same thing except for only one difference here: 馁:Ancient literary Chinese 饿:Modern spoken Chinese
Jun 30, 2019 3:18 AM
Answers · 6
First sentence is too long and needed breaking. A small change to the last sentence 馁 is an ancient Chinese language, also known as Literary Chinese. It is a traditional style of written Chinese that has evolved from the classical language, making it different from any modern spoken form of Chinese. The two characters mean the same thing except for only one difference shown below: 馁:Ancient literary Chinese 饿:Modern spoken Chinese
June 30, 2019
I agree with Greg’s minor rewrite of one of your sentences: “The two characters mean the same thing except for only one difference shown below:” However, the rest of your post is fine; there’s no need to write separate sentences. (Congratulations on your high level of English — it’s not easy for a native Chinese speaker.) In particular, I love the way the non-restrictive relative clause “which is a traditional style of written Chinese that evolved from the classical language” comes right after the word that it modifies (“Literary Chinese”). The last part of the first sentence seems a little unclear, so we could perhaps make it into a separate sentence (see below). There’s just one big problem: Your sentence doesn’t clearly and unambiguously mean what you intended it to mean (I saw the context — the question you’re answering). 馁 is *not* an ancient Chinese *language*, but a *word* in Ancient Chinese (“Literary Chinese” or “Classical Chinese”). Likewise, 饿 is a *word* in Modern Chinese. Here’s what I’d write: 馁 is used “Ancient Chinese”, also known as Literary Chinese, which is a traditional style of written Chinese that evolved from the classical language. Literary Chinese is thus different from any modern spoken form of Chinese.
June 30, 2019
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