Pasha
Should I use any or some in these sentences? Could you explain why? If there are any (some) words you don't understand, use a dictionary. If anybody ( somebody ) phones me while I'm out, tell me their phone number, please.
Oct 13, 2019 6:39 PM
Answers · 5
For an English exam, use "... any words" and "... anybody phones." For ordinary speech, native speakers will use either the negative or positive form (any/some, anybody/somebody) depending on their view of the probability of none/nobody. Example: Is there any bread left? [possibly, there isn't any bread to eat] Is there some bread left? [probably, there is some bread to eat] English Grammar in Use by Murphy is an excellent book. A paper copy is affordable and a google search will find a PDF copy. 4th edition - Unit 84 - Some and any - p. 170 [excerpt] We use both some and any in questions. We use some/somebody/something to talk about a person or thing that we know exists, or we think exists. - Are you waiting for somebody? (I think you are waiting for somebody) We use some in questions when we offer or ask for things. - Would you like something to eat? (there is something to eat) - Can I have some sugar, please? (there is probably some sugar I can have) We often use any after if: - If anyone has any questions, I'll be pleased to answer them.
October 13, 2019
Hi Pasha About any/some: The general rule is that any is used for questions and negatives while some is used for positive. About anybody/somebody: -Anybody is a pronoun with no specific reference. No known person is referred to. "Does anybody want ice-cream?" - Somebody is more specific. The context may imply a named person, but the named is not mentioned. "Somebody forgot to put the cap back on the toothpaste." An extra suggestion: Anybody/somebody is used in more informal conversations. The more formal versions are anyone/someone. I hope this helps.
October 13, 2019
For the first one, you need to use "any" . "Any" is used in negative statements, while "some" is for positive statements. In the second sentence, both "anybody" and "somebody" can be correct. The difference is that "anybody" is way more general and non-specific than "somebody". "Is anybody reading the book now?" --- There is huge group of people, and you have no idea who might be reading the book at that specific moment. "Somebody is knocking the door." --- Here you might even know who is knocking the door, it's not something totally unknown. I hope this helps!
October 13, 2019
any
October 13, 2019
anybody
October 13, 2019
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!
Pasha
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English